The Death of Riviera








June 28 Morning










July 18 Afternoon





August 22 Afternoon





December 29 Morning


December 31 Afternoon

January 3 Afternoon





January 9



















January 14




Prologue: The Sounds of Summer.


The Columbus Dispatch  June 13, 2015


Riviera Golf Club - June 16, 2006


Epilogue

February 10, 2016

Regarding the Trees at Riviera

I am extremely concerned about the proposal made by Riviera Venture LLC to remove so many mature trees from Riviera.  In response, the Friends of Dublin listed a counter proposal on their website.  These 58 trees are mature, stately specimens and deserve preservation.

As a layperson and avid gardener, I wondered about the ages of the trees in question.

So, I looked up a variety of tables online and found there is a pretty standard formula for figuring it out.  Assuming that the trees were measured correctly (caliper at 4.5 feet from the ground), I was astounded at the results!

The information listed below was taken primarily from the International Society of Arboriculture website.  A growth factor (for example x3) is used to calculate the age of a tree based on species and diameter.   There were two maples (Sweet and Freeman’s) I could not find, so I estimated conservatively, based on how maples grow.

Pin Oak x3
Little leaf Linden x3
Sweet gum x4
Red Maple x4.5
Sugar maple x5.5
Silver maple x3
River birch x3.5
London Plane x3
Scots Pine x4
Blue spruce x6
Honey Locust x4
Red Oak x4
White pine x5
Linden x3
River Birch x3.5
Ornamental Pear x3


The table below from the Friends of Dublin website shows the trees that the group requests saving.


Tree
Caliper Inches
Condition
Species
Factor
Age
37
12
Good
Red Maple
4.5
54
444
12
Good
Red Maple
4.5
54
147
13
Good
Red Maple
4.5
58.5
334
14
Good
Blue Spruce
6
84
404
15
Good
Sweet Gum
4
60
535
15
Good
Thornless Honey Locust
4
60
622
15
Good
Sugar Maple
5.5
82.5
903
15
Good
Sweet Gum
4
60
642
16
Good
Sweet Gum
4
60
794
16
Good
London Planetree
3
48
902
16
Good
Ornamental Pear
3
48
243
17
Good
Sweet Gum
4
68
450
17
Good
Black Locust
4
68
904
17
Good
Sweet Gum
4
68
66
18
Good
Scots Pine
4
72
76
18
Good
Thornless Honey Locust
4
72
656
18
Good
Sweet Gum
4
72
858
18
Good
Sweet Gum
4
72
134
19
Good
London Plane
3
57
256
19
Good
Sweet Gum
4
76
224
20
Good
Sugar Maple
5.5
110
251
20
Good
Sweet Gum
4
80
301
20
Good
Sweet Gum
4
80
380
20
Good
Sweet Gum
4
80
449
20
Fair
Black Locust
4
80
516
20
Good
Freeman Maple
Est. 4
80
542
20
Good
Linden
3
60
49
21
Good
Linden
3
63
443
21
Good
Red Oak
4
63
154
22
Good
Red Oak
4
88
160
22
Good
Linden
3
66
442
22
Good
White Pine
5
110
797
22
Good
Sweet Gum
4
88
302
23
Good
River Birch
3.5
80.5
660
23
Good
Sweet Maple
Est. 4
92
21
24
Good
Sugar Maple
5.5
132
156
24
Good
Red Oak
4
96
270
24
Good
Linden
3
72
512
24
Good
Sugar Maple
5.5
132
614
24
Good
Sweet Gum
4
96
143
26
Good
London Planetree
3
78
441
26
Good
Red Oak
4
104
19
28
Good
Thornless Honey Locust
4
112
22
28
Good
London Planetree
3
84
51
28
Good
Pin Oak
3
84
57
28
Good
Pin Oak
3
84
155
28
Good
Red Oak
4
112
159
28
Good
Linden
3
84
177
28
Good
Littleleaf Linden
3
84
330
28
Good
Pin Oak
3
84
336
29
Good
London Planetree
3
87
18
30
Good
London Planetree
3
90
55
30
Good
Pin Oak
3
90
371
30
Good
Pin Oak
3
90
381
30
Good
Red Oak
4
120
391
30
Good
Pin Oak
3
90
692
31
Good
Pin Oak
3
93
149
34
Good
Pin Oak
3
102

Their ages range from 48- 120 years old based on the size/factor equation.  Their combined ages equal 4714.5 years!!  What a legacy to treasure!

So many of these trees have been alive longer than most of us who live in the area. 
Fifty-two are 60+ years old, making them true GOLDEN BUCKEYES.  Twenty five are in their 80’s and 90’s (noted in bold type).  Nine are over 100 years old! 

The thirty-four trees that are eighty-to-well over one hundred years old have seen a lot. Historical references were found in Dublin (Images of America) by Nancy L. Richison.

The two 132-year-old sugar maples were saplings in 1884, the year before a town pump was installed at Bridge and High Streets to serve residents and horses pulling carts.

In 1912, a cyclone damaged the Methodist Episcopal and Presbyterian churches.  The congregations joined the Christian church to become Dublin Community Church.  Sugar maples, white pine, red oak, and honey locust were already growing and thriving.  

Girls were first allowed to play on basketball teams at Dublin High School in 1921 and O’Shaughnessy Dam was built in 1925.  Trees that began their growth in 1926 include sweet maple, red oak, sweet gum and pin oak and are over 90 years old.

The stone bridge crossing the Scioto was built as part of the Works Progress Administration Program in 1935.  Sweet gum, Littleleaf Linden, London Planetree and numerous pin oaks had begun to grow.

The trees that are seventy-one years and older ushered in the era after WWII ended. 

During Thanksgiving weekend in 1950, a freak snowstorm dumped 20 inches of snow and created drifts up to 25 feet deep.   A diverse group of forty-five trees survived and thrive today.

I could go on and on with the number of changes and events that have occurred in Dublin over time.  The rate of change brought about by people has increased, but nature’s timetable is a constant.

The fifty-eight trees on the list above are healthy and deserve the opportunity to flourish and enhance the property and the city of Dublin.  It would be an absolute travesty for the City to grant a variance to kill these trees.   Further, the Developer should be required to safeguard the above trees during the construction process.   The City needs to have an active watchdog to assure these trees are saved.

Respectfully,
Becky Klosterman, Dublin resident since 1989
6801 Vineyard Haven Loop
Dublin, Ohio 43016





September 3, 2016

7th Fairway

May 27, 2016




June 3, 2017